Two Types of Meditations

There are two types of meditations: one that will keep you in the dark & another that will show you the light that you truly desire.

I found that there are two main ways of using meditation: One is to help us tune in, and then there’s its opposite, to tune ourselves out. When we do the former one, it’s because we truly want to connect and we have a genuine interest in receiving our messages and guidance from our inner guide. Whereas the later one is more because we have a desire to escape from something in our life, rather than figuring out what to do with it — which is what would actually help us move forward. It is, of course, always better to meditate than not to; it helps us in one way or another. It’s just that one way of using meditation is much more beneficial for us than the other.

There’s a tremendous difference in the way I feel today when I meditate in comparison to when I meditated in the past. Years ago, I had a lot going on in my life and I wasn’t sure what I could do to really help myself at that time. I’ve known meditation to be a great tool to help with feeling more ease and creating a greater opening to receive answers and clear next-step-directions from my peaceful inner guide, so I decided to go for it.

What I didn’t realize at the time was that I was using meditation as a form of escaping rather than connecting to myself. By doing this, I was preventing myself from getting the very thing I was seeking — clear answers to my questions, a better understanding of my inner world, and a genuine connection to my higher self. Subconsciously, I was telling myself that I did my part by meditating and, therefore, my issues should resolve themselves on their own. I was unknowingly dismissing myself and avoiding taking the real action steps that were necessary for me to take so that real progress would be made.

After doing this for a while, I wasn’t feeling as good as I had anticipated or as I had before — neither during nor after my meditation process. Doing this kind of meditation wasn’t providing me with the kind of good feelings I wanted to feel after meditating. This type of meditation was no longer affecting me in the positive ways it had before. Although I did feel somewhat of a relief, it still wasn’t exactly the kind of relief that I was searching for. I felt that there was something I simply wasn’t quite getting. Following my realization was a determination I developed that led me to figuring out how I can meditate in a way that I would truly benefit from it.

My determination led me to finding a youtube video by Kyle Cease on meditation which led me to trying out meditating in the way he suggests, which then also led me to talk with my husband about meditating in a way that would help me connect rather than disconnect to myself.

The kind of meditating I understood from their descriptions was one where I am aware of all of my thoughts (the ones I like & the ones that I’m less fond of), and I acknowledge their existence, recognizing that I’m not them. In this way I allow my thoughts to be exactly what they are, feeling totally okay with their presence within me. All this while I breath with them — that, in itself, being my calm response to them, my acceptance of them and my trust in them that they’re there only to help me. This was and is my golden path to awesome breakthroughs in every area of my life!

Meditation, in its essence, is something that can help us improve our life experience. Whether we use it for that purpose or not is our choice. Just like anything else in our life really (our relationships, friendships, watching tv, shopping, our eating habits, what we do when we’re on Facebook, etc.) that we can benefit from or use to distract ourselves from what truly requires our attention. For instance, we can choose to enjoy watching our favorite tv shows because it simply feels good to do so, or we can watch those shows as a replacement for doing the productive things we planned for ourselves the day before. Another example of misusing something good that we have in our lives is spending time with our significant other as a replacement for spending the kind of quality time we’re really seeking with ourselves.

Basically, we can choose to do the very same thing and get very different emotional and physical results. The reason behind this is our initial intention.

I learned that the difference in the way I previously meditated as opposed to the way I meditate today is purely my intention and purpose of meditating in the first place. One way is in order to replace and escape something I don’t want to deal with and the other is so that I can connect to myself and to my inner world — in a way that I truly allow myself to increasingly understand my ever-expanding Self.

If you’re a meditator, which one are you? Is that the one you’re really looking to be and/or become?